5 Best Camera Apps

Phones are a wonderful thing that many of us cannot possibly fathom being without. They are always with us in our purses, pockets and hands. We use the camera on our phones for anything and everything. For selfies, which have become a right of passage and life style incorporated in songs and a favourite occurrence on twitter and Facebook. To pictures of our dinner, family pictures, the mountains and beach and every other thing in-between.

Our phones are consistently being updated with the camera being a main focus for many. We aren’t always satisfied with the simple picture in the way it was taken. Instagram really spearheaded the fad of filters and editing that has simply expanded and grown since. Take a look below at the top 5 camera apps available on iTunes today!

1. Facetune   But first… let me take a selfie! “A fun and powerful portrait and selfie photo editor” We now have the ultimate selfie editor! You can correct blemishes, spots or scars on the skin to make it perfect. Or you can give yourself white teeth. It gives you the capability to retouch and add artistic flair to selfies and portraits easily.pic1

2. Afterlight  “Perfect image editing app for quick and straight forward editing” It has 15 adjustment tools, 59 filters, 66 different textures along with cropping, transforming tools, and 128 different types of frames to add and edit your photo with! Just as it says, it is wonderfully simply and straight forward for anyone to use and play around with.pic2

3.Camera+  Over 10 million people are using Camera+. “If the iPhone’s standard camera is like a digital point and shoot, the Camera+ app is like a high quality SLR lends”—TIME: 50 Best iPhone Apps 2011. This app will make you truly love taking photos again. Touch Exposure and Focus, up to a 6x digital zoom, front flash, levels, and many different shooting modes you will easily be able to take marvellous photos. On top of that there is a clarity setting that analyses your photos, scene modes, effects, and Lightbox to help make the mood you are wanting. Camera+ is also making it easy to keep sync with your other devices! Finishing touches are available with borders and captions as well.

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4. Party Party    We all love a good party pic! “More than your own personal photo booth” This app has taken to a new level to photos to having stop motion animation. Allowing you to adjust the speed, save as a looping video for vine or Instagram or save as a .gif file for blogs, tubmlrs or websites. You can move them into square collages or the classic layout of a strip. There are only 17 filter and 9 frames but the main focus of Party Party is the stop animation that we just can’t seem to get enough of!

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5. Faded   Faded has won the endorsement of many, “The best photo app on the iPhone is Faded” by John Mayer. Specializing in film inspired looks, it includes 46 filters, 12 profession adjustments, various effects, camera tools, and overlays. It also keeps your history so that you can always revert back at any point.

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Apps are constantly being updated as well. They are adding more features and easing the process. As well as they all have the handy sharing feature to all popular social media sites that we know, love and spending the majority of our time on. Making it easy and convenient to share photos of your latest adventure, food consumption or best mate.

This post has kindly been contributed by:  Phink 

 

 

An Apple a day….

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An Apple a day….Apple have this week been forced to pay out 32.5 million dollars to settle a legal complaint about the company’s practices that allowed children to make purchases in mobile apps without parents’ permission. Apple themselves are reacting positively to help in this matter as reported in the Daily Tech recently. Whilst not exactly agreeing in the ruling, Apple have decided not to fight it and doubtless they will revisit their in app purchase mechanisms to ensure that the issue is resolved once and for all.

Well, ……big sigh and roll of the eyes. What on earth is going on here? Where does this leave us in a world where digital devices are increasingly user friendly and accessible?  Imagine, for instance, a scenario where a young child makes an actual phone call and orders up a luxury suite in the Ritz for 2 nights on his mother’s credit card. Who is responsible for allowing that transaction? The phone company for allowing this misuse of the phone? Or the credit card company for facilitating a payment via phone by a minor masquerading as their parent?  What if a young person accidentally cuts their finger off whilst opening a particularly tricky packet of crisps? The knife manufacturer surely should have safeguarded against that…or wait, how about we task the crisp manufacturer with taking a more responsible approach to packaging, ensure that its impossible to cut yourself whilst using scissors.

The ruling against Apple is one which seems to forget the role of the responsible adult. In this case the adult who had purchased the smart phone or tablet which has facilitated the act of purchasing some game add ons. The adult in this case who should be providing a moral grounding to the child and explaining that in app purchases are a “no no”. or more realistically ….. perhaps these in app elements can be purchased occasionally on a one by one permission basis….and on it goes. Those are the first few aspects we might expect a parent or a responsible adult to consider when handing over a connected device like that to a child.

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But crucially if a parental responsibility is too much effort  there are other methods to prevent the risk. For example:

Use the settings of their device set to prevent such purchases. Thats the end of the risk. The discussion need go not further. problem solved.

Talk to their children, explain the issue./Apply rules of use.Suggest that the Lock Down will happen if the rules are broken.  Hold on a moment…. I just need to find someone’s grandmother and teach them how to suck eggs.

We practise this sort of basic approach with animals. Pet shop owners do not have the “damned puppy” – they sold to little Freddie’s mother only last week- returned with complaints of  “he ruined my carpet” or “he messed my lawn”…why not? Because Freddie’s Mother  applies some common sense and realises that the dog is not in fact responsible for his misdemeanour’s. Maybe he will be after he has been trained…… but even then the sensible approach would not be to hold the dog to account because…. the pet owner has the task of teaching the pet to avoid chewing the carpet or digging the grass. Hey ho…..

It would be great to know the logic that leads to the ruling against Apple. Thoughts from our readers please?